DETERMINING STYLE OF PLAY
The DM provides the adventure and the world. The players and the DM work together to create the game as a whole. However, it’s your responsibility to guide the way the game is played. The best way to accomplish this is learning what the players want and figuring out what you want as well. Many styles of play exist, but a few are detailed below as examples.

from http://www.darkshire.net/~jhkim/rpg/theory/models/dmg_styles.html

This seems to be an important principle to keep in mind when focussing on the role of a Drama teacher in any online or networked environment for doing drama.

The working title of my research is “Drama Teacher as Game Master”, and is intended to reflect the role that a Game (or Dungeon)Master plays in RPG. There is a necessary collaboration between players (learners) and game master (teacher) to craete and maintain the fictional world of the drama.

The process is in some way “collaborative fiction” http://www.geocities.com/aegisweb/9-Articles/91-CollFic.html or “deep-immersion storytelling” – (John Kim has discussed some aspects of this in his article on Reverse Drama http://www.darkshire.net/~jhkim/rpg/theory/narrative/immersivestory.html – it is necessarily open to facilitate a generative learning model. The nature of the learning will be greater than any prescribed curriculum; it will also be personal and transformative.

Beyond Role and Play
Tools, Toys and Theory for Harnessing the Imagination
The Electronic Edition
The book for Solmukohta 2004. Edited by Markus Montola and Jaakko Stenros, foreword by Frans Mäyrä.

ISBN 952-91-6843-8 (pdf)
ISBN 952-91-6842-X (paperback)

Beyond Role and Play is a collection of articles by researchers and role-playing game enthusiasts from seven countries, made for the Nordic role-playing convention Solmukohta 04. The book offers practical tools, analytical viewpoints, inspirational game reviews and fresh methodological ideas for all who take role-playing seriously. The book covers both tabletop and live-action role-playing as an artform, a political tool, an educational method and as great entertainment.

I’m going to set about authoring a small game (using Creative Adventure Toolkit http://www.richmond62.freeserve.co.uk/index.htm ) to try to explore some of the structures that may need to be included in a networked drama model.

Zemanta Pixie

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.